Review: Downsizing

Well that was disappointing. Paul Safranek lives a pretty unfulfilling life, always supporting others but not especially giving in to his own wants or needs. Drowning in debt, living small with big dreams, he convinces his wife to join him on a newly discovered science: Downsizing. Living in a miniature world, being only ten centimeters…

Review: The Great Wall

Yimou Zhang, stop doing collaborations with America, right now. When two European bandits stumble across China’s greatest defensive achievement, The Great Wall, while looking for “black powder”, they discover a terrible and world-ending secret. Well this was pretty dumb. I think the film drops the ball almost immediately with two small points. We open with…

Review: Jason Bourne

The perplexingly titled Jason Bourne arrives nine years after the last entry of the series, and honestly, doesn’t deliver anything new. When Nicki, an ex-Treadstone operative, uncovers new secrets about the closed operation and the existence of a new one, she calls on Jason Bourne to look into it. The super agent has all but…

Trilogy Review: Bourne

An opportunity to rewatch and review one of my favourite film trilogies of all time? Sign me up! The Bourne Identity (2002) I imagine a lot of people forget the more humble, stealthy experience that is the beginning of the Bourne story. When a man is found afloat in the ocean he finds he has…

Review: The Martian (2D)

Director Ripley Scott delivers stunning visuals to accompany this space survivalist flick. Matt Damon plays Mark Watney, an astronaut botanist who takes part in a space mission to the planet Mars, but when their mission is cut drastically short due to a storm, the team lose him and presume him dead. With the crew returning…

Review: Interstellar (2D)

Interstellar‘s beauty is skin deep: at its best it is inspiring and gorgeous to look at; at its worst it can be cliched and paradoxically lacking in explanation. Planet Earth is dying. The land is turning into a dustbowl and little to no life or vegetation can survive the dust storms that ravage the surface….

Review: The Zero Theorem

A story of a man’s existential crisis in a high tech future as he tries to comprehend the meaning of life, and whether or not everything is meaningless. Hard to fathom, but I found this original story to move me just enough to be intrigued. Qohen Leth (Christoph Waltz) is a technician, one of many,…

Review: The Monuments Men

The Monuments Men is less of a heist film and more of a casual stroll through a war museum. Towards the end of World War Two, with Allied forces pushing into Germany and the Russians also bearing down on Europe, one officer forms a small unit of scholars to go into dangerous areas and recover…

Review: Elysium

District 9 director Neill Blomkamp returns with yet another muddy, high tech vision of a dystopian future, maintaining a vigil on social equalities or lack thereof. It doesn’t quite stand up to District’s brutish reality or metaphor, but it is a decent ride. The film follows Max and Frey, two kids who grew up on…

Review: Invictus

Took me a while to watch it, and I had my reservations beforehand, but Invictus is simple but compelling. I think I have my issues with sports films, mostly because there’s very little scope or variety; they almost always tell of an underdog struggling to succeed and overcome adversity, and they always do. Invictus I…